15 Surprising Stats About Mobile Tech in Post-Desktop Era

The “desktop” computer is dead. Yes, it is. We are in the post-desktop era and nothing says that louder than the following 15 stats, which I’ve borrowed in whole from […]

The “desktop” computer is dead.

Yes, it is.

We are in the post-desktop era and nothing says that louder than the following 15 stats, which I’ve borrowed in whole from the good folks at Digiday:

  • The U.S. is at 101 percent wireless penetration. (CTIA)

  • 1 billion smartphones will be shipped globally this year. (Gartner)

  • Apple beats all other phone manufacturers in customer satisfaction for smartphones. (J.D. Power and Associates)

  • 59 percent of mobile users are as comfortable with mobile advertising as they are with TV and online ads. (InMobi)

  • 85 percent of mobile users prefer mobile apps over the mobile Web. (Compuware)

  • 75 percent of Americans bring their phones to the bathroom. (11 Mark)

  • 15 percent have answered their mobile phone while having sex. (Wilson Electronics)

  • Mobile advertising revenue is expected to reach over $11 billion worldwide this year, up from over $9 billion last year. (Gartner)

  • Mobile drives 23 percent of paid-search clicks. (The Search Agency)

  • Americans spend an average of 158 minutes every day on their smartphones and tablets. (Flurry)

  • 15 percent of mobile users prefer to check financial accounts on smartphones and tablets. (Quicken)

  • 42 percent of consumers using a mobile device while in-store spend more than $1,000. (Interactive Advertising Bureau)

  • Mobile now accounts for 12 percent of Americans’ media consumption time, triple its share in 2009. (eMarketer)

  • 39 percent of mobile users access social networks from their phones. (Business Insider)

  • Mobile commerce will account for 15 percent of total e-commerce sales this year. (eMarketer)

 

About brock

Brock is currently the Executive Editor at Atlantic Media Strategies and former Chief Washington Correspondent for MSNBC; he is the founder/creator/editor of CyberWire Dispatch, the Net's pioneering online journalistic news service. Previously he was the Director of Communications for the Center for Democracy & Technology, a non-profit, Washington, D.C.-based public interest group working to keep the Internet open, innovative and free. The views expressed here are his alone and do not reflect the opinions, attitudes or policy positions of his employer(s) past or present.