Haiti Tragedy Plays Out in Real Time

Once again social media is proving it has the chops to stay in a breaking news cycle foot race with mainstream media.  Citizen photojournalists are kicking ass on the “big […]

Once again social media is proving it has the chops to stay in a breaking news cycle foot race with mainstream media.  Citizen photojournalists are kicking ass on the “big dawgs” when it comes to getting images out of Haiti during this time of disaster.

The video referenced below has an out-of-breath, unknown photographer providing real time commentary on the earthquake as seen from a distance, in the mountains.  It is chilling.  At the very end of the video we hear, in English:  “The world is coming to an end!”

The following comes from Global Voices:

The Caribbean blogosphere is busy tonight, discussing very sad news – an earthquake measuring 7.3 on the Richter Scale struck off the coast of Haiti, causing major damage and loss of life in the already besieged island nation.

Twitter emerged as the fastest, most time sensitive vehicle through which to report on the catastrophe; Facebook was also full of wall comments on the disaster, from both French and English-speaking Caribbean netizens. One user in Trinidad and Tobago was already collecting “foodstuff, blankets & clothing for Haiti”, asking donors to “label all bags”. Others, like Jamaica-based Annie Paul, quoted lyrics from calypsonian David Rudder‘s ode to the island: “Haiti, I’m sorry…but one day we’ll turn our heads, restore your glory”, following up with links to video of the earthquake, which she found posted on YouTube:

And “Behind Blondie Park” is carrying some compelling images and accounts as well.

About brock

Brock is currently the Executive Editor at Atlantic Media Strategies and former Chief Washington Correspondent for MSNBC; he is the founder/creator/editor of CyberWire Dispatch, the Net's pioneering online journalistic news service. Previously he was the Director of Communications for the Center for Democracy & Technology, a non-profit, Washington, D.C.-based public interest group working to keep the Internet open, innovative and free. The views expressed here are his alone and do not reflect the opinions, attitudes or policy positions of his employer(s) past or present.